Do Factory Farms Need a Pooper-Scooper Law?

Pooper-scooper signage in the Washington DC metropolitan area. Credit: Dan Klotz

Pooper-scooper signage in the Washington DC metropolitan area. Credit: Dan Klotz

In 1978, New York embraced a major public health and environmental innovation.  The idea, which became known as the “Pooper-Scooper Law,” was that all dog owners must collect their pets’ waste and deposit it in the trash so that it didn’t muck up the urban environment.

Industrial-scale livestock operations—known as factory farms—annually generate 500 million tons of manure in the United States, more than three times the amount generated by people in the U.S. Should all that manure go directly into our environment? More at National Geographic’s NewsWatch blog, http://on.natgeo.com/19Nj6xa.

Has the Chesapeake Bay turned the corner in 2011?

Image

A piece I wrote for NationalGeographic.com looks at how we’ve moved closer to a cleaner Chesapeake Bay in 2011.  A concerted push to cut back on factory farm run-off and other pollution, plus reductions in the amount of Atlantic menhaden caught at the mouth of the bay, could add up to better water quality and a healthier ecosystem.  http://bit.ly/xaPgzq


Sunrise off of Sandy Point State Park, MD. Credit: Dan Klotz